Book Review: The Mother Fault by Kate Mildenhall

Breaking the dry spell of dystopian reviews with this next book.

Blurb

Mim’s husband is missing. No one knows where Ben is, but everyone wants to find him – especially The Department. And they should know, the all-seeing government body has fitted the entire population with a universal tracking chip to keep them ‘safe’.

But suddenly Ben can’t be tracked. And Mim is questioned, made to surrender her passport and threatened with the unthinkable – her two children being taken into care at the notorious BestLife.

Cornered, Mim risks everything to go on the run to find her husband – and a part of herself, long gone, that is brave enough to tackle the journey ahead.

From the stark backroads of the Australian outback to a terrifying sea voyage, Mim is forced to shuck off who she was – mother, daughter, wife, sister – and become the woman she needs to be to save her family and herself.

The Mother Fault book review

Review

I have mixed feelings about The Mother Fault. On one side, I really liked the female characters and what they represented. Mim is such a strong female, doing all she can to protect her family and stand up against the regime. Her daughter Essie is equally as impressive, especially considering the fact she has her own teenage turmoils go through. Respect to the touching scene of Essie’s first period.

However, something was missing from The Mother Fault. I felt like I’d entered a series halfway through. The story would have gained from more information about the regime and Mim and Ben’s relationship. There was many times I didn’t understand Mim’s decisions because the context behind them wasn’t strong enough. I also felt like the ending was tied up too quickly and it didn’t leave me feeling satisfied.

Overall, not a bad book but not for me. If you would like to give it a try, you can buy The Mother Fault here.

I was sent a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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