Book Review: Camp by David Hatton

The best WWII historical fiction I’ve ever read? Possibly so. Judge for yourself.

Blurb

1925 – a curious George Taylor has left Britain behind to explore the gay capital of Europe: Berlin. But just as he’s starting to settle into his new home, an upcoming election threatens the liberated lifestyle for which he’d moved to Germany for. The Nazi Party are gaining popularity across the country and their ruthless leader, Adolf Hitler, is determined to punish homosexuals across the nation and beyond. Is George’s life coming to an end just as it’s only truly begun? Nobody can imagine the horrors that await him and his friends.

Camp book cover

Review

I love WWII fiction but, admittedly, it can become a bit repetitive once you’ve read a view. However, there was something about the blurb of Camp that told me I shouldn’t pass this on. I’m so glad I listened.

The most obvious thing that made Camp so special was it that focuses on how homosexuals were treated during WWII. There is so little written about how these people suffered. I’m ashamed to say that I never noticed before, and I’m really grateful to the author opening my eyes on the topic. Therefore, the book presented information I didn’t know before and, as a result, a story I’d never heard. And the story isn’t restricted to George’s life in Berlin. It follows him from the time he explores his sexually to the ripe old age of 97.

What I wasn’t expecting from Camp was a truly beautiful love story. I’m afraid I can’t go into much detail as I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but I was just so touched by George’s story. I cried both out of happiness and anger for him. The beauty of this book also goes beyond the realm of romantic relationships. Family relationships and friendships also play a key role and balance the atrocious deeds that occur with the wonderful moments which life also gives us.

I know that Camp won’t leave me for a long time. Ensure at least one 5-star review this year by picking up your copy here.

I was sent a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Check out more books from David Hatton here.

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